[E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell


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  1. says: Read The Great War and Modern Memory [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read

    [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Read The Great War and Modern Memory Very enjoyable very thought provoking but not necessarily very convincing Fussell's sui generis book is an extended literary criticism masuerading as social history – or perhaps the other way round There are various argum

  2. says: [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell

    Read The Great War and Modern Memory characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read When Bill aka uo recommended this to me a couple of weeks ago I really didn’t think I would get to it anytime soon I also decided that it would be a military book or sorts dealing perhaps with how what is remembered of a war isn’t necessarily what actually happened If that had been what it was about it would have been an interesting enough book but this proved much better than I could have anticipatedThis book looks at how various most

  3. says: [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell

    [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell When war broke out the undergraduate Robert Graves pictured what service he might render as garrison duty—litera

  4. says: [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell

    characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read Read The Great War and Modern Memory This masterful book published in 1975 provides a rewarding set of explorations in the way our experience of the war has been captured by literature and thereby filtered into our collective memory and understanding of it Fussell focuses almost

  5. says: Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell

    [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Read for a history course at Southwest Texas State in the 1980s It was a before and after book Before the Great War was retronymed World War One in my database after it was not That by itself was a huge reorientation of my thinkingA friend called this read to mind today and I got to thinking about historiography and its pleasures the mental laziness of accepting the nonce words bandied about instead of seeking out the contemporaneous view

  6. says: Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell

    characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read Note I've read this book twice the first time years ago I set the read date as today so it updates on the Facebook wall properlyIn this landmark text from 1975 Fussell an American scholar and veteran looks at a

  7. says: Read The Great War and Modern Memory Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell

    [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read A great book Using the tools of literary criticism to reflect on WW1 Fussell digs into how the war changed consciousness It was the war Fussell argues that makes the modern age an age of irony Traditional notions of the war virtues like honour valour and bravery disappeared into the shit and mud of the Western Front The cynicism towards authority and the official view portrayed in newspapers etc started in the war The troops could read Th

  8. says: Read The Great War and Modern Memory [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell

    characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell I rarely read non fiction but this just took my breath away It's both a wonderful and achingly sad introduction to the poets and writers who eme

  9. says: [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell

    [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read Extraordinary One of the best books I've read on WWI By employing literary critiue Fussell manages to capture virtually ever

  10. says: [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Read The Great War and Modern Memory

    [E–pub] The Great War and Modern Memory AUTHOR Paul Fussell Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read Read The Great War and Modern Memory THE GREAT WAR AND MODERN MEMORY is the kind of war book that is especially cherished by people who feel morally obligated to hate war or perhaps accurately to hate the soldiers mostly but not always men who fight it Back in the days

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Read The Great War and Modern Memory

Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read The Great War and Modern Memory Free read ð PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Lies contexts both actual and literary for writers who have most effectively memorialized the Great War as an historical experience with conspicuous imaginative and artistic meaning These writers include the classic memoirists Siegfried Sassoon Robert Graves and Edmund Blunden and poets David Jones Isaac Rosenberg and Wilfred Owen In his new introduction Fussell discusses the critical responses to his work the authors and works that inspired his own writing and the elements whi. Note I ve read this book twice the first time years ago I set the read date as today so it updates on the Facebook wall properlyIn this landmark text from 1975 Fussell an American scholar and veteran looks at a selection of writings from certain soldier authors on the Western Front and examines the implications of same when it comes to how the war should best be understood It s difficult to express how influential this book has been or how widely it has been hailed since its publication it won the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award and is on the list of the Modern Library s one hundred best important non fiction books of the twentieth century It has never been out of print and comes in three distinct editions the original 1975 volume from the Oxford University Press the 2000 follow up to same a 25th Anniversary edition that boasted a new afterword from the author and the most recent a lavish new illustrated edition from Sterling released in 2012 on the occasion of the author s death It is greatly expanded with full colour plates throughout and the layout though not the content has been substantially revisedI repeat that it s an extraordinarily influential work and has had a citation history since its publication that could almost be described as Total that is it was very hard for a very long time to find a book on the war that did not include some nod to Fussell and his ideas It also led to a trend in naming books about the war with a similar convention see Stefan Goebel s The Great War and Medieval Memory 2007 or Jason Crouthamel s The Great War and German Memory 2009 for but two examples there are many but I guess I can t really complain about thatIn any event it s a big deal so why am I upsetFussell has faced a steady stream of criticism from historians of the war he is primarily a literary scholar as am I but even than that has characterized himself first as a pissed off infantryman for his over reliance on an archly editorial tone and a tendency to indulge in errors of fact when it makes for a good narrative There s a now famous critiue of the book by the military historians Robin Prior and Trevor Wilson that first appeared in War in History 11 1994 in which the two compare it to his later similar work on WWII Wartime Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War 1989 The second book is another story but when it comes to the first they are critical of what they see as Fussell s hostility to anything resembling official history and of his reliance upon utterly subjective literary engagements to tell the real truth This anyway is one of the famous critiues there are certainly othersFor his own part Fussell has responded to his critics in the Afterwood to the 2000 edition of his work after a fashion His errors of fact and grossly polemic tone remain in that edition and in the new illustrated edition too and all he offers in response is the suggestion that his critics are heartless apathetes who don t understand suffering and that as he was only writing in the elegaic mood to begin with demanding historical accuracy of him was a foolish move on their part Yeah how dare they He has elsewhere made it clear in an essay included in his Thank God for the Atom Bomb collection though I can t remember its name that he thinks authors who respond to their critics in depth are idiots so I guess it was never meant to be but an ounce of humility might have been niceAnyway with due admission of the importance it holds to many people and the reputation that it has won there is much about that makes it a very poor bookFussell makes a very big deal about how he wants to get back to what the real regular men doing the real fighting had to say and think about the war experience and to wrest command of this idea away from the intellectuals the generals the politicians the official narrative To do this he has written a book that offers as real regular men such luminaries as Siegfried Sassoon Robert Graves Edmund Blunden and Wilfred Owen men that is who were all recipients of expansive educations enjoyed a great deal of leisure in their civilian lives Sassoon was as notorious for his fox hunting as he was for his literary salons for example and had such exuisitely artistic intellectual sensibilities that their first response to combat was to write sonnets about it As fantastic as these writers were and as impressive specimens of men regular they are notFussell indulges in gross sensationalism as a matter of course in a bid to support his book s overarching thesis which is that war generally and the Great War even so is a fundamentally ironic enterprise He conveys facts about the war in a manner calculated to bring out their apparent irony and stupidity but it is very easy to go too far with this as he does when he blandly asserts in the book s early pages that the war saw eight million men killed because an archduke and his wife had been shot paraphrased but not by much I can get the actual citation if you like This is the kind of thing as are various claims about Sir Douglas Haig that s of a nature so trivializing reductive and vicious that it would likely see a student who attempted it drummed out of his program The unelouent Sir Douglas attempt to offer some words of inspiration to the BEF during the German Spring Offensive of 1918 which resulted in the catastrophic rout of the British army along a considerable front earns him a comparison to Hitler for exampleThere s also a certain strange ignorance on display in what he chooses to address someone so fixated on the war s irony and the literary dimensions of it can not easily be forgiven for having nothing whatever to say about the death of HH Saki Munro in 1916 Saki was one of the most famous English literary ironists of his time and the supremely ironic manner of his death cut down by a sniper in the act of scolding an enlisted man for lighting a too noticeable cigarette at night would seem to make him an ideal inclusion in a book of this sort But no not even mentioned once At another point Fussell says something factually incorrect about Kipling s The Irish Guards in the Great War 1923 and then uses this error as a platform from which to breezily attack Kipling s character This was actually the first deficiency I noticed in the work when I read it for the first time and it put me on my guard at onceThere are other things he fails to mention and with considerably important conseuences He views the war as always an ironic and chaotic enterprise and so studiously neglects to include anything about those elements of the war that were neither ironic nor especially chaotic You will look in vain for anything useful in this book about the war in the air or at sea or on the many non Western fronts that saw real gains being made in measurable and conseuential ways The war s purposelessness and futility are again and again hammered home but without giving any recognition to the experience of the many countries and peoples such as those within the former Austro Hungarian Empire for whom the war was the complete opposite of those thingsIf you want a book that confirms practically every bias exhibited by what everyone knows about the First World War The Great War and Modern Memory is the way to go in part in fact it is responsible for crafting what everyone knows so thoroughly influential has it been I would rather a newcomer read practically anything else though at least at firstIn addition to all the above there have been further and uite merited criticisms from feminist scholars who have noted that Fussell s characterization of modern memory is often exclusively masculine Even his gestures towards sexuality and romantic love are primarily homosexual and homosocial Claire Tylee s The Great War and Women s Consciousness 1990 is probably the best book length engagement with Fussell s ideas in this regard if you can find a copy If you don t feel like reading an entire book on this the same author s The Great War and Modern Memory What is Being Repressed in Women s Studies uarterly 233 4 1995 offers an article lengthed precisIt remains an essential work though one with a reputation that is slowly and I may say thankfully eroding There are several that could be said to have supplanted it or at least supplemented itSamuel Hynes A War Imagined The First World War and English Culture 1990 has become a standard text on this subject though also a controversial one from an historical point of view Hynes characterizes the war as a gap in history and to the point insists that those who experienced it viewed it in the same way While Hynes is far comprehensive in the types and amount of literature he surveys than Fussell was he still tends to highlight only those works that confirm what he proposes about the war s historical impact Plenty is excluded More to the point Hynes writes of what he calls The Myth of the war a generation of innocent young men their heads full of high abstractions like Honour Glory and England went off to war to make the world safe for democracy They were slaughtered in stupid battles planned by stupid generals Those who survived were shocked disillusioned and embittered by their war experiences and saw that their real enemies were not the Germans but the old men at home who had lied to them They rejected the values of the society that had sent them to war and in doing so separated their own generation from the past and from their cultural inheritanceWhile Hynes acknowledges as he should that this is an absurd oversimplification of everything involved in it it is nevertheless the mythic lens through which many modern people observe the war The myth he says has value even though it is historically suspect I don t entirely agree myself Hynes cites the myth to mean in his words not a falsification of reality but an imaginative version of it The historian would say that it is indeed a falsification of reality to claim the things in the uoted paragraph above or at least an overt rhetoricization of realityAnyway Hynes is not the only one worth considering though the text remains a big one Janet Watson s Fighting Different Wars Experience Memory and the First World War in Britain 2004 is a fantastic volume that attempts to offer a rigorously historicized corrective to the work produced by the likes of Fussell or Hynes She is particularly interested in the period s book culture but also in how those who experienced the war men women children everyone conceived of that experience alternately as work or service The two conceptions produce very different reactions and inform very different types of cultural memory and Watson does a marvelous job unpacking the implications Well worth checking out if you can get itI should close by admitting that even in spite of all the above the book does have merits Fussell is nothing if not an engaging writer and the analyses he provides of Graves Blunden et al is uite good indeed The book was also very important in opening up new lines of inuiry into the war and its culture that have since borne much promising fruit For the book itself though the day has rather passed For the student already well versed in the backdrop of the war itself there s much here to be enjoyed I just wouldn t put it into the hands of a neophyte

characters ´ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ↠ Paul Fussell

The Great War and Modern Memory

Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read The Great War and Modern Memory Free read ð PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Ch influence our understanding and memory of war Fussell also shares the stirring experience of his research at the Imperial War Museum's Department of Documents Fussell includes a new Suggested Further Reading ListFussell's landmark study of World War I remains as original and gripping today as ever before a literate literary and illuminating account of the Great War the one that changed a generation ushered in the modern era and revolutionized how we see the world 14 halftone. I rarely read non fiction but this just took my breath away It s both a wonderful and achingly sad introduction to the poets and writers who emerged or didn t from World War I as well as an eye opening description of how that conflict shaped modern life

Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read

Paul Fussell ↠ 6 Free read The Great War and Modern Memory Free read ð PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB The year 2000 marks the 25th anniversary of one of the most original and gripping volumes ever written about the First World War Fussell illuminates a war that changed a generation and revolutionised the way we see the world He explores the British experience on the western Front from 1914 to 1918 focusing on the various literary means by which it has been remembered conventionalized and mythologized It is also about the literary dimensions of the experience itself Fussell supp. When war broke out the undergraduate Robert Graves pictured what service he might render as garrison duty literally holding down the fort while the professional Regular Army charged to glory on the continent The 100000 strong force of British Regulars ferried across the channel in August 1914 to protect Belgium and assist the French was all used up by early November It is said the high command and the staff officers survived the old army was beyond recall This isn t war cried an appalled Lord Kitchener when he learned of the casualties consumed in the first collisions of those ignorant and hopeful armies coming on with storybook airs and futuristic firepower To me the early clashes of autumn 1914 make one of the fascinating episodes of the Great War A voice from within the whirlwind This is a terrible war and I don t suspect there is an idle British soldier in France I wonder where it will end one hears so much There has been fighting and loss of life crowded into seven weeks than there was in the whole of South Africa It is awful what the Brigade of Guards have lost and being like one big regiment one knows everyone and feels it all the The last two days have been ghastly The Germans broke through the line We have lost ten officers in the last two days and yesterday the battalion was less than 200 men though I expect some stragglers will turn up All the officers in my company were lost except myself We have had no rest at all Everyone is very shaken The soldier writing his mother thus in September 1914 was twenty one year old 2nd Lt Neville Leslie Woodroffe 1st Battalion Irish Guards the regiment in which Rudyard Kipling lost two sons and whose official history he wrote At First Ypres on 6 November Woodroffe and the remnants of his company were all shot down counterattacking a trench from which they d been ousted I think he s a beautiful Georgian war martyr than the Bloomsbury Apollo Rupert Brooke That eye Haunting And it s hard to imagine this ephebic studio apotheosis bearded and begrimed and blasting at Germans with a rifleEngland at war Fussell s pictures are fascinating Life seemed to stand uneasily still and in no direction was there any prospect Churchill the Regular Army obliterated Deadlock the government silent but there are rumors in the pubs and families in mourning everywhere you look But of course they don t and can t know Lloyd George a draft of millions for 1916 s war ending Big Push the slaughter of infantry changes nothing decides nothing 60000 men down on the first day and Haig buts away at the German lines for another five months until 400000 are gone the Front so near the guns audible to Kent and Sussex an officer granted leave breakfasts in the trenches and dines at his club in London Both Fortnum Mason and Harrod s specialized in gift assortments for the front Fortnum s fruit cake being especially popular for lasting well a society s powers of euphemism and denial strained to the limit Keep Calm Carry On Don t think you know better than Haig scapegoat the Pacifist for saying what we all fear Open Secrets so many have died and nothing is working a generation of Britons flounders in slime and shit drowns in a vast excremental slough scattered in the millions of muddy men are the poets Sassoon Owen Blunden enter the Armageddonite landscape plowed by infernal engines carrying with them three hundred years of sophisticated literary pastoralism England s inheritance of dulcet rural airs and homoerotic elegy The stylistic traditionalism of most of England s Great War writing Fussell writes has prevented us from seeing its connections to modernism Fussell made me feel bad for having uncritically accepted the Stein Lawrence view at least as summarized by Ann Douglas that American writers were best suited to writing the Great War because of America s relative detachment from English literary convention specious flummery anyway because of its recent experience of mechanized attrition the Civil War because of the nervous tension and demonic primitivism of classic American literature Moby Dick Poe s nightmares and because of the precedents of spare and unsentimental war writing in American prose Ambrose Bierce Grant s and Sherman s memoirs That s all well and good Fussell says if you don t care about irony Fussell is interested in English war writing because Sassoon Owen and Blunden modify ironically the pre modern tropes and imagery with which they must describe a modern experience Sardonic but deeply conscious engagement with tradition the oneness of innovation and remembering new meanings from old meanings is what interests Fussell Literature is writing that remembers and refers and Fussell doesn t buy the argument rather the attitude the pose that Literature is made mute by horrors I dunno I find Wilfred Owen too richly Keatsian and Hemingway spare to the point of half wittedness Fussell ranges beyond WWI memoirs and poems to show how the Great War produced a mythic narrative of twentieth century technological conflict that later writers absorbed and augmented none brilliantly than Pynchon Fussell refers to Gravity s Rainbow throughout and in his conclusion says it represents almost the first time the ritual of military remembering is freed from all puritan lexical constraint and allowed to take place with a full appropriate obscenity I ve heard Gravity s Rainbow invoked as a digest of wildly different insights so it must be one of those mega anatomies touching Everything I ll add it to the list of to reads spawned by this by every book

  • Paperback
  • 368
  • The Great War and Modern Memory
  • Paul Fussell
  • English
  • 05 December 2018
  • 9780195133325