(Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams


  • Hardcover
  • 222
  • Just Food
  • James McWilliams
  • English
  • 01 March 2020
  • 9780316033749

10 thoughts on “(Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams

  1. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams Let me begin this review by saying that the subtitle of this book – Where Locavores Get it Wrong – is a bit misleading Author James McWilliams isn't on a rampage against locavorism per se but rather against overly simplistic solutions to the incredibly complex problem of how to feed our planet's 7 billion and still growing population in a way that is truly environmentally sustainable McWilliams is a history professo

  2. says: James McWilliams º 4 Free read (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams

    review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read Summary Just Food It's a six year old book but still one that goes into a lot of science that many folks don't want to believe even when the science is pretty clear But there's good news which the author of Just Food writes about in Even th

  3. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams Just Foods is an important book in the continuing and continually escalating debate over how we should grow our food and what we should eat Environmental historian and reformed locavore James McWilliams invites us to think logically and dispassionately about some of the most important food issues of our time and of the future Having read two of McWilliams' previous books I expected a controversial detailed and well documented d

  4. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read A disclaimer I only made it through the first chapter I would like to try again when I have calmed down a bit As someone who relies on the people around us to eat locally grown organic produce I probably have uite a differ

  5. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams Summary Just Food

    Summary Just Food (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read Each year I try to read one book that goes against the grain of how I think about things I picked “Just Food” without knowing much about it

  6. says: review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read Summary Just Food

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams McWilliams is an excellent researcher He has some very worthwhile ideas And he seems to have a genuinely balanced perspective As unconventional as it is in our increasingly polarized society he swims against the current of schismogenesis and

  7. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams Summary Just Food

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams To start the blurb Everyone who has read up on their Michael Pollan should also read Just Food is misleading While it is true that I think Just Food is an important read it by no means is a counter argument against everything Pollan has written; in fact it agrees with some of Pollan's ideas That being said The first half of the book I regretted ever picking it up I found myself on the receiving end of a repetitive lect

  8. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read Summary Just Food

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams 35 stars because I'd give it 4 stars for general information and 3 stars for readability McWilliams is passionate about his subject global environmental agriculture and the ways in which we in our limited local spheres can help to enact better sustainable global practices and he is often highly informative opinionated and mostly convincing He traces his own journey from committed locavore to someone aware and better educated about actual en

  9. says: (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read

    Summary Just Food (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams this book was good i thought about giving it 4 stars but could not bring my self to overlook the fact that he never thought to uestion If the solutions he was presenting where just putting off the collapse of our whole food system I like readi

  10. says: James McWilliams º 4 Free read review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams

    (Just Food) [PDF/EBOOK] á James McWilliams review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams James McWilliams º 4 Free read This is clearly an important book and the star rating system doesn't really do justice to it So if you're wondering whether to read this book consider it a five star review It has some flaws but as someone said of Kant if I recall correctly the mistakes of a great thinker are valuable than a thousand correct platitudes from a lesser oneMcWilliams takes on one of the hottest topics in food politics the whole uestion of the locavore

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Just Food

Just Food Free read · 104 Oes for fresh food what Fast Food Nation Houghton Mifflin 2001 did for fast food challenging conventional views and cutting through layers of myth and misinformation For instance an imported tomato is energy efficient than a local green. A disclaimer I only made it through the first chapter I would like to try again when I have calmed down a bit As someone who relies on the people around us to eat locally grown organic produce I probably have uite a different view than the author and most people who will read this book That being said the author made some sweeping generalizations about how we as Americans consume local goods His claim that most people can t tell the difference between a store bought tomato and a freshly picked farmers market tomato If you can t tell the difference you have no tastebuds His assertion that you can t always trust your farmer when they claim to grow organically and sustainably If you don t trust your farmer you can t claim to truly KNOW your farmerI agree that eating locally in terms of food miles isn t the only answer to creating a sustainable food system there are tons of other factors that you need to consider However that isn t to say that paying attention to how and how far your food travels is a bad idea The introduction to this book though made it seem that it wasn t worth it to eat locally that it wouldn t make any difference Not true Supporting local sustainable business is good for everyone Even if you only participate a tiny bit you re doing your part and it IS making a difference

review ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook º James McWilliams

Just Food Free read · 104 House grown tomato And farm raised freshwater fish may soon be the most sustainable source of protein Informative and surprising JUST FOOD tells us how to decide what to eat and how our choices can help save the planet and feed the worl. To start the blurb Everyone who has read up on their Michael Pollan should also read Just Food is misleading While it is true that I think Just Food is an important read it by no means is a counter argument against everything Pollan has written in fact it agrees with some of Pollan s ideas That being said The first half of the book I regretted ever picking it up I found myself on the receiving end of a repetitive lecture about the fallacies of locavores and organic produce The writing also had an air of superiority and was condescending to the reader I had to put it down and take a break for a few weeks and read something else I was glad that I returned to read the rest of the book instead of filing it away under could not finish Once McWilliams went into genetically modified crops we started to reach common ground and the writing wasn t as condescending nor did it feel so much as a lecture any When I reached the meat production and freshwater auaculture portions it was even smoother sailing through the pages The important thing to remember about McWilliams is that he is approaching agriculture production from a sustainability and environmental point of view Most of my reading on agriculture production has been aimed at the best possible way to produce the healthiest products It was refreshin G night yet eye opening to approach the topic from a different point of view Just Food helps to encourage informed and educated consumerism It gives the toolsbread crumbs as to what to consider when purchasing food from fruits to vegetables to meats to fish and The second half of the book made pushing through the first half worth the time The Grace That Keeps This World tomato And farm raised freshwater fish may soon be The Kitchen Boy A Novel of the Last Tsar the most sustainable source of protein Informative and surprising JUST FOOD Sleep No More tells us how The Investigators to decide what The Unsettlers to eat and how our choices can help save Trouble Makes a Comeback Trouble #2 the planet and feed Trouble Never Sleeps the worl. To start The Power to Get Things Done their Michael Pollan should also read Just Food is misleading While it is The Power to Get Things Done true Arkansas that I Safe House think Just Food is an important read it by no means is a counter argument against everything Pollan has written in fact it agrees with some of Pollan s ideas That being said The first half of The Power Playbook the book I regretted ever picking it up I found myself on Uglen the receiving end of a repetitive lecture about The Big Year A Tale of Man Nature and Fowl Obsession the fallacies of locavores and organic produce The writing also had an air of superiority and was condescending The Difference to The Woman Next Door the reader I had Engineering Science to put it down and The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear take a break for a few weeks and read something else I was glad The Confessions of Young Nero Nero #1 that I returned The Grace of Silence to read The Wonder Trail the rest of A Woman Clothed With the Sun Eight Great Appearances of Our Lady in Modern Times the book instead of filing it away under could not finish Once McWilliams went into genetically modified crops we started Seule au rendez vous to reach common ground and Season in Rihata the writing wasn Sparkle in the Cowboy's Eyes t as condescending nor did it feel so much as a lecture any When I reached Arctic Summer the meat production and freshwater auaculture portions it was even smoother sailing Un homme un cri through Josephine the pages The important Where Oliver Fits thing Sois poli dis merci to remember about McWilliams is Dixie Ghosts American Ghosts that he is approaching agriculture production from a sustainability and environmental point of view Most of my reading on agriculture production has been aimed at Murder of a Bookstore Babe Scumble River Mystery #13 the best possible way Les Soeurs Robin to produce 恋人は発情期 the healthiest products It was refreshin G night yet eye opening The Iron Princess Sons of the North #2 to approach Desirada the The Power and the Glory topic from a different point of view Just Food helps Le Jeu du monde to encourage informed and educated consumerism It gives Staggerford's Indian the Le Journal de Louise B toolsbread crumbs as Galop de l'ange to what Fang The Gnome to consider when purchasing food from fruits Le Faucon afghanUn voyage au pays de Talibans to vegetables Le salon des berces to meats Le Jade Et Lobsidienne to fish and The second half of Helping Yourself With Esp the book made pushing Mój Chrystus połamany through Selected Poetry the first half worth Selected Poetry the Convergence Foreigner #18 time

Summary Just Food

Just Food Free read · 104 We suffer today from food anxiety bombarded as we are with confusing messages about how to eat an ethical diet Should we eat locally Is organic really better for the environment Can genetically modified foods be good for you JUST FOOD d. Let me begin this review by saying that the subtitle of this book Where Locavores Get it Wrong is a bit misleading Author James McWilliams isn t on a rampage against locavorism per se but rather against overly simplistic solutions to the incredibly complex problem of how to feed our planet s 7 billion and still growing population in a way that is truly environmentally sustainable McWilliams is a history professor down in Austin and a former locavore himself But one day he found himself giving in to nagging concerns that he was doing little than salving my conscience by buying overpriced tomatoes and cooking with parsnips when the weather got chilly Those doubts led him to do some serious research into food production and come to some unorthodox yet ultimately hopeful conclusionsHe begins his discussion with an examination of the food miles concept It seems to make so much sense purchasing food close to where you live cuts down on transportation and thus global warming and is therefore a good thing The problem however is that transportation actually accounts for only 11% of the energy used to get something to your table Because than half of that energy goes to production those wishing to reduce their carbon footprint would be much better served to study production methods and make choices based on that information instead In one dramatic example he points out that it is four times energy efficient for London consumers to buy grass fed lamb imported by ship from New Zealand than it is to buy grain fed lamb raised locally In addition a ruthless commitment to buying local may work out well for you if you happen to live in an area capable of abundant food production but it begins to break down when you start thinking about people who live in say Arizona or impoverished people in developing countries who depend upon exporting their crops for survivalThe next sacred cow McWilliams goes after is organic farming While he thinks the organic movement has accomplished a great deal in the last few decades it is by no means free of environmental problems While bucolic photos of rural landscapes may grace the packages of food sold organically the reality is that any kind of farming be it organic or conventional is all about interfering with nature Bugs that are not killed with synthetic pesticides still have to be dealt with and just because organic growers use compounds already found in nature doesn t mean they re not poison In addition refraining from using weed killers may make organic seem better for the soil but not using chemicals to kill weeds results in significantly tillage which contributes to problems with soil erosion McWilliams makes clear that he s not trying to dis organic by raising these concerns but rather to counter the inflated claim that it s the only alternative to today s wasteful conventional production He is searching for a golden mean that recognizes the benefits of organic practices but can also make use of those aspects of conventional agriculture that have proven beneficial Towards that end he then examines the issue of genetically modified crops McWillliams encourages us to move beyond our knee jerk reaction to Frankenfoods and really examine the science behind these crops which while not risk free are significantly safer than they ve been portrayed in the popular media He makes a compelling and detailed argument that these risks are well worth the benefits on offer and that responsibly managed GM crops can increase yields and biodiversity reduce tillage and toxic chemical use and preserve landscapes all while feeding billions of people in a way that organic alone will simply never be able to doFrom there McWilliams moves on to the touchy subject of meat production He outlines in gruesome detail the enormous environmental costs not only of factory farms but also of those of righteous sounding grass fed livestock operations While the later are an improvement over the former in terms of energy used for production not to mention ethics grass fed animals actually contribute dramatically methane to the atmosphere and on any sort of scale are still very destructive to the land The underlying issue is that land based animals are astoundingly poor converters of energy conventional cattle reuire 33 calories of input for every 1 produced resulting in a hugely inefficient system that McWilliams argue we simply cannot afford on a planet where both population and meat consumption are growing at exponential rates Eat meat if you must he says but know that the most effective thing you can do to reduce your food footprint is to treat it like caviar and eat a lot lessMcWilliams believes the future of affordable and environmentally sustainable protein lies in auaculture If you ve heard any of the horror stories about fish farms this may come as a surprise and McWilliams does not shy away from discussing the terrible problems caused by these operations particularly in developing countries with no environmental regulation With the exception of salmon and shrimp however American fish farms are getting a decent environmental mark with home grown catfish tilapia and trout doing better than average What was most fascinating to me about this chapter however was his discussion of the infant industry of fish based polyculture closed systems that integrate freshwater fish and plant production These operations are experiencing a bonanza of environmentally friendly high yield production that holds enormous promise There are of course major hurdles to be overcome in the process of creating a sustainable and environmentally friendly food system one of the biggest of which is the elimination of the perverse subsidy system that actually encourages food producers to engage in wasteful and destructive practices McWilliams touches briefly on the importance of activism in eliminating these subsidies but doesn t go into much detail on this subject Instead he uses his closing chapter to return to the biggest problem with locavorism which is that if you really want to be an environmentalist you have to think about not just how to feed yourself and your neighbors but everyone in the world It s a lot easier to slap a buy local bumper sticker on the car than it is to try to wrap the mind around the complex and often counter intuitive lessons he reveals here and there were times when he went into technical detail than I really needed to know Despite that fact I think this is an important book for anyone who is seriously concerned about sustainable eating It s my first on the subject so I don t know how he compares with Michael Pollan but if anybody out there has read both authors I d love to hear